Seven Unmissable Member Events This Week: March 28 - April 3

 Cathy Elliott is a mother whose children were taken away, in  Children of God . 

Cathy Elliott is a mother whose children were taken away, in Children of God

Children of God 
Children of God is a powerful musical about an Oji-Cree family whose children were taken away to a residential school. After Urban Ink's successful 2017 premiere production in Vancouver, it was presented at the National Arts Centre. "A triumph" with a story that is “a major step on the path toward reconciliation,” says the Ottawa Citizen, while the Globe and Mail calls it “must-see theatre.” On opening night of this co-production with Western Canada Theatre, at the Sagebrush Theatre, the playwright Corey Payette and Kevin Loring, the artistic director of the new National Arts Centre Indigenous Theatre, give a short presentation, hosted by WCT executive director Lori Marchand. This is Marchand's final opening night with WCT before she joins Loring at the NAC Indigenous Theatre as managing director.
(Kamloops: Mar. 29-Apr. 7)

 RupLoops is an interactive, live looping performance. | Image: RupLoops.

RupLoops is an interactive, live looping performance. | Image: RupLoops.

RupLoops: The Human Radio
A is for attitude; B is beatboxing; and C is for cool—as in, tots who dig hip-hop. Carousel Theatre for Young People's presentation of Vancouver musician Rup Sidhu's latest beatbox show is recommended for kids, but his live-looped vocal percussions, clever rhythmic rhymes and eclectic instrumentals should have wide appeal at Waterfront Theatre on Granville Island. (Vancouver: Mar. 30)

 Amlie, by Deanna Fligg. | Image: Port Moody Arts Centre.

Amlie, by Deanna Fligg. | Image: Port Moody Arts Centre.

Deanna Fligg: Nectar
Every once in a while, we worry about the plight of bees and Colony Collapse Disorder—until we forget. BC painter Deanna Fligg creates vivid paintings of bees and thinks about how different our lives will be when bees no longer pollinate our crops. "Sometimes, the smallest creature on the planet can have the largest impact," says Fligg, whose first solo exhibition takes place at the Port Moody Arts Centre.
(Port Moody: Mar. 26-Apr. 28)

 Khan's watercolour paintings transport viewers around the globe. | Image: Massey Theatre.

Khan's watercolour paintings transport viewers around the globe. | Image: Massey Theatre.

The Art of Khan: A Journey with Watercolour
Architect Shameem Khan always used watercolour to convey design projects. Then came digital rendering and the role of watercolour receded. But after winning an award at a Nanaimo art festival, Khan decided to immerse herself in the "unpredictable and wonderful ways of watercolour" once again. Khan's subject matter spans the globe, from plazas and cafes in Italy and Spain, to the grey, wet streets of London, at the Plaskett Gallery.
(New Westminster: Apr. 3-28)

Why Art Matters: Art, SFU and Reconciliation with Dana Claxton, Richard William Hill and John O'Brian
Art helps us understand our world, including reconciliation. This discussion focuses on a painting that has caused controversy since it was commissioned by TD Bank and installed at Simon Fraser University in 2004. The large mural, by Charles Comfort, was met with protests by those who opposed its representation of Indigenous history. Yet it remains. At SFU Burnaby, this panel, featuring great art scholars Dana Claxton, Richard William Hill and John O'Brian, will explore questions of institutional power and responsibility.
(Vancouver: Mar. 29)

Flamenco Rosario: Studio Showing
Flamenco goes high tech in Rosario Ancer's free preview at The Dance Centre. In this piece, each dancer’s shoes are wirelessly connected to a computer that coordinates colourful stage lighting based on the dancers’ input. Michael Heid is the software whiz.
(Vancouver: Mar. 29)  

 Cherry Blossoms at Burrard Station in Vancouver. | Image: Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival.

Cherry Blossoms at Burrard Station in Vancouver. | Image: Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival.

Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival
Every festival should have one: A theme song. The Vancouver Cherry Blossom Festival celebrates its 13th year with a choir of 300 voices belting out its new official song Cherry Blossoms For You & Me, written by Juno-winning artist Tom Landa and Robin Layne. Co-presented by the Canadian Music Centre and comprising more than 30 local choirs, the free event takes place April 3 at Christ Church Cathedral. Everyone is welcome to learn the material and sing along here, and at all VCBF pop-up singing events: Cherry Jam Downtown Concert (April 5, at Burrard SkyTrain Station), Sakura Days Japan Fair (April 14-15 at VanDusen Botanical Garden), and The Big Picnic (April 14, at Queen Elizabeth Park). Wouldn't it be great, say the organizers, if we all learned the song and sang it while walking under blossom canopies during the festival? See a full schedule of all festival events here.
(Vancouver: Apr. 3-29)

For more member events, check out our Member News page. To see your event on the BC Alliance website, email your press release to Nancy Lanthier at nancy@allianceforarts.com.

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