Six Unmissable Member Events This Week: May 9 - 15

Ballet B.C. Program 3
On a high since breaking sales records with its last show, Romeo + Juliet, Ballet BC follows up with a program of mixed works that includes the world premiere of artistic director Emily Molnar's as-yet-untitled choreographic collaboration with Vancouver’s Phoenix Chamber Choir. The score draws on the choral music of Latvian composer Peteris Vasks. At Queen Elizabeth Theatre.
(Vancouver: May 10-12)

Snug Cove, by Louise Drescher | Image: louisedrescher.com.

Snug Cove, by Louise Drescher | Image: louisedrescher.com.

Louise Drescher: Beautiful Bowen Island
Drop in on Bowen Island's arts scene at the opening of this show by Louise Drescher, who has showcased her work internationally. Drescher's latest work at the Bowen Island Arts Council's spiffy new Cove Commons gallery, "celebrates the joy of living on such a wonderful island," and recalls another Canadian artist who loves the water, E.J. Hughes.
(Bowen Island: May 9-June 4; opening reception May 12, 6-8 p.m.)

Best Brothers
Canadian playwright Daniel MacIvor takes on death for this comedy. Two brothers — one gay and free-spirited, the other straight and serious — sort out funeral arrangements and their mother’s estate after her sudden passing, and somehow things couldn’t be funnier. Okay, it’s probably the dog. Western Canada Theatre stages the shenanigans at Kay Meek Centre — the brass of which is so stoked by the winning production, it invites Alliance News subscribers to see it for half price. Use code ALLIANCE.
(West Vancouver: May 9-19)

TomoeArts presents original choreographies and favourite dances of the late Fujima Yūko at Scotiabank Dance Centre.

TomoeArts presents original choreographies and favourite dances of the late Fujima Yūko at Scotiabank Dance Centre.

Yūko-kai - A Concert of Japanese Dance
Vancouver-based Japanese classical dance specialists TomoeArts present an evening of nihon buyoh at Scotiabank Dance Centre. The traditional dance stems back to the early 17th century and has developed into a detailed art form that incorporates storytelling, character, pantomimic gesture and virtuoso movement patterns.
(Vancouver: May 12)

Victoria Symphony: Verdi Requiem
Verdi's dramatic gifts are on full display in this work — the writing for the four vocal soloists especially impressive. He composed the work following the death, in 1873, of the poet and novelist Alessandro Manzoni. Grief-stricken, he wrote to a friend: "With him the purest, the holiest and the highest of our glories comes to an end." The Victoria Symphony is joined by the mighty Victoria Choral Society for the monumental work, at the Royal Theatre.
(Victoria: May 12-13)  

At his Vogue Theatre appearances, David Sedaris will present readings and recollections, as well as host a Q & A session and post-show book signing. | Image: The Barclay Agency.

At his Vogue Theatre appearances, David Sedaris will present readings and recollections, as well as host a Q & A session and post-show book signing. | Image: The Barclay Agency.

Vancouver Writers Festival Presents An Evening With David Sedaris
American humorist and author David Sedaris' latest book, Theft by Finding: Diaries (1977–2002) is a distillation of thousands of diary entries, which include meeting his partner, Hugh, dealing with drug and alcohol addictions, and finding fame. Sedaris, who speaks about the book and anything else that draws his sardonic wit, at the Vogue Theatre, was recently interviewed by Ideas Network. "I just started one day. I was 20 years old. And if you had told me the day before that 'Tomorrow, you're going to start keeping a diary and you’re going to keep it forever,' I would have said, 'No, I’m not.' It just started one day. I was hitchhiking across the country, and I was in the Pacific Northwest, and I was in a coffee shop, and I turned the placemat over, and I wrote on the back of it. And that was the first day." Most people will start a diary but give up within weeks. Asked what kept him going for 40 years, Sedaris replied, "Well, I think the mistake people make who do it for a short while, is they start, and then they read over what they just wrote. And that's a huge mistake. Because if you've just been writing for a week, you're not going to be very good. You’re going to read over what you wrote and you're going to think, "Oh no, that's awful." So, you're going to stop. So, the key is not to read it. Just keep going, stack up the pages. Read what you've written yesterday five years from now and then you're a safe distance from it, and you can laugh at it. And you can say, 'Oh my goodness, look how awful I was back then."'
(Vancouver: May 13-14)

For more member events, check out our Member News page. To see your event on the BC Alliance website, email your press release to Nancy Lanthier at nancy@allianceforarts.com.

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